SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

What horsepower garage door opener do I need to lift my door?

Before installing a garage door opener, please complete the following tests to make sure your garage door is properly balanced and is not sticking or binding:

  • Lift the garage door about half-way open as shown. Release the door. If properly balanced, the door should remain in place, supported entirely by its springs.
  • Raise and lower the door to see if there is any binding or sticking. The door should move freely and easily, without dragging or becoming difficult to move.

An easy rule of thumb is that a 10-year-old child should be able to lift and lower the garage door with little or no effort. If the door is hard to lift, the door must be serviced and adjusted by a professional authorized dealer.

Please remember that the easier it is for you to operate your garage door manually, the easier it will be for the new garage door opener to open the door, resulting in a longer lifespan for the new system. In general, a properly balanced and aligned single-car or two-car garage door can be raised and lowered with a ½ horsepower opener. For some heavier doors, we have ¾ horsepower openers available.

Which model is better, the chain drive, the belt drive or the screw drive?

Each style of “drive system” has its advantages. Chain drive and belt drive openers work well in all types of applications. Screw drive openers are better choices when you have a one-piece tilt open door, as they run slightly slower, and allow a smoother movement of the one-piece type of doors.

Belt drive openers are the smoothest, most quiet openers we manufacture, and have an excellent reliability record. They are recommended for use whenever noise and vibration are important considerations. If there is a living space above or near the garage, the belt drive openers will minimize the amount of noise generated by the opener.

Chain drive openers have been in production for the longest amount of time, and offer dependable performance year in and year out.

Regardless of which type of opener you choose, all of our drive systems are very reliable and require virtually no maintenance throughout the life of the opener.

Will your garage door opener open my eight, nine, or ten-foot door?

All LiftMaster® openers, with the proper installation components, can raise up to a 10-foot high garage door. Certain model LiftMaster openers can raise up to a 14-foot high door. Your local authorized LiftMaster dealer can provide recommendations for which models will best suit your needs. Prior to the installation of your LiftMaster garage door opener, your installing dealer will verify that the proper equipment will be used for your garage door.

It is time to replace my garage door opener. Can I just replace the motor head and reuse the existing rail and other hardware?

This is rarely a possible or appropriate way to replace your opener. Due to changes in the designs of our systems, and for warranty purposes, Chamberlain® strongly recommends that all new components are used for the new opener. In addition, although it may seem to be an easier way to install a new opener, it may actually be more difficult to attempt to replace only the motor head.

What is the difference between AC and DC Motors? What are the advantages of each type of motor?

AC Motors are less expensive and easy to manufacture. Speed is constant and hard to control efficiently.

DC Motors are more expensive as they are more complex to manufacture. Also, additional components are required to make them work with the standard AC current found in homes. Speed can be controlled more easily with a DC motor and more accurately. They have a quick response to control signals. Due to easier speed control, DC motors can be used in applications where powerful but in control performance is desired, such as the soft start/stop feature.


TROUBLE SHOOTING

How do I test the automatic reverse system?

Your garage door opener utilizes two safety reversal systems. The most apparent safety component is The Protector System®, which provides optical coverage along the bottom area of the doorway. To test this system, perform the following steps:

  • Press the remote control push button to raise the garage door.
  • Place a box or similar object in the path of the door.
  • Press the remote control push button to close the door.

The door will not move more than 1 inch, and the opener lights will flash. The garage door opener will not close from a remote if the indicator light in either one of the sensors is off (alerting you to the fact that the sensor is misaligned or obstructed).

WARNING: If the opener closes the door when the safety-reversing sensor is obstructed (and the sensors are no more than 6 inches above the floor), call for a trained door systems technician.

There are a few things to keep in mind concerning the optical safety reversal system:

  • The optical safety system must be installed in order for the opener to close the door normally. The system is federally mandated, and there is absolutely no way to bypass this system.
  • If there is a sensor problem, the opener can still be used to close the garage door. In order to do so, press and hold the hard-wired wall control button, or use the keyless entry pad outside of the garage, holding the ENTER button until the door reaches the floor. Releasing the wall control button or the ENTER button before the door reaches the floor will cause the opener to reverse the door. This option is only available through the wall control or a keyless entry system, and is not an option when using the hand-held remote control.
  • Never rely on the safety sensors to prevent the door from closing on an obstruction. Always ensure that the path of the garage door is clear of any obstructions before operating the opener mechanism.The second safety system built in to the opener is designed to reverse the garage door whenever resistance is encountered, provided that the opener mechanism is installed and adjusted properly, and the garage door is properly balanced and aligned. This reversal system should be tested each time an adjustment to the opener is made, and also once a month.To test the safety reversal system:
  • With the door fully open, place a 1-½ inch board (or 2×4 laid flat) on the floor, centered under the garage door.
  • Operate the door in the down direction. The door must reverse upon striking an obstruction.
  • If the door stops on the obstruction, it is not traveling far enough in the down direction. Refer to your owner’s manual for instructions on increasing the down limit adjustment, along with more information concerning the safety reversal test. A copy of your owner’s manual can be downloaded through our Web site by clicking here (hyperlink to owner’s manual search page)
  • If the door continues to fail the safety reversal test, call for a trained door systems technician.
  • Never rely on the safety reversal system to prevent the door from closing on an obstruction. Always ensure that the path of the garage door is clear of any obstructions before operating the opener mechanism.

WARNING: Without a properly installed safety reversal system, persons (particularly small children) can be seriously injured or killed by a closing garage door.

Why does my garage door reverse as it is closing?

All garage door openers manufactured after January 1, 1993 include the federally mandated Safety Sensor Reversing System®. These sensors are found four to six inches above the garage floor and protect the door opening with an invisible beam. If there is any problem with the safety sensors, the light bulb on the opener will flash 10 times and the garage door will not close unless constant pressure is applied to the wall button.

There are a few different things that can cause this type of problem, which are listed below with corresponding solutions:

  • Clear any obstruction from between the safety sensors. Loose leaves, trash, and dirt on the lens of the sensor itself are all examples of things that can obstruct the sensor’s signal.
  • Check each sensor for a steady glowing indicator light. If both indicator lights are on, or if one indicator light is flickering, the sensors may be slightly misaligned. To check for misalignment; obstruct the beam of the sensors so that they cannot see each other. When the beam is blocked, the indicator light on one of the two sensors will temporarily go out. This is the receiving sensor. Remove the obstruction and loosen the wing nut on the back of the receiving sensor. Adjust the receiving sensor until the green indicator light goes out, if not already out, then realign until the green light is bright and steady, then retighten the wing nut. This usually takes a couple of attempts before it is back in alignment.
  • If an indicator light is out on one or both sensors, check for a possible loose or shorted wire. Sensor wires are attached to the white and black terminals on the back or side panel of the overhead motor unit. Check that they are securely connected to each terminal. Also check the wires for any breaks, especially anywhere they are spliced together.

After any adjustment to the sensors, the opener itself, or the garage door, both safety systems must be tested:

  • Press the remote control push button to raise the garage door.
  • Place a box or similar object in the path of the door.
  • Press the remote control push button to close the door. The door will not move more than one inch, and the opener lights will flash.

The garage door opener will not close from a remote control if the indicator light in either one of the sensors is off (alerting you to the fact that the sensor is misaligned or obstructed).

  • With the door fully open, place a 1-½ inch board (or 2×4 laid flat) on the floor, centered under the garage door.
  • Operate the door in the down direction. The door must reverse upon striking an obstruction.
  • If the door stops on the obstruction, it is not traveling far enough in the down direction. Refer to your owner’s manual for instructions on increasing the down limit adjustment, along with more information concerning the safety reversal test.

WARNING: Without a properly installed safety reversal system, persons (particularly small children) can be seriously injured or killed by a closing garage door. If the opener closes the door when the safety-reversing sensor is obstructed (and the sensors are no more than 6 inches above the floor), call for a trained door systems technician..

I press the button for my garage door opener and I hear the motor running, but the garage door does not seem to move. What is wrong? If the opener makes a humming sound for at least 10 seconds, as if the electric motor is running, but the door does not move, then the opener may have damaged or worn gears inside the overhead motor case. You can verify this by removing the metal wrap-around cover from the overhead case. Any damage to the gears will be readily apparent.

There is a small light on my opener that is flashing. Is this normal?

If the small LED near the Learn button is flashing, it may be an indication of a problem with the opener. However, if your opener has been operating normally, and you have noticed no problems with the system at all, then the flashing of the light is likely not something to be concerned with. If the opener has ever been operated multiple times (7-8) in a short amount of time (30 minutes), it may have overheated slightly. The opener has a built in sensor that will shut the system down, allowing it to cool, and then will automatically allow the system to begin running again. It is not unusual for this type of situation to occur when the opener is installed, as the door may have been sent up and down several times in order to have all of the adjustments set properly. Once the light begins to flash, it will continue to do so until the opener is unplugged for at least 20 seconds. Plugging the opener back in should reset the system, and the light should will stop flashing.

The lights on my garage door opener don’t turn on. What can I do?

If the opener’s light bulbs do not turn on, but all other functions of the opener seem to work properly, then there is usually a quick and easy solution:

  • Unplug the garage door opener.
  • Remove the light bulb, and check to be sure the bulb is not burned out.
  • Locate the small metal tab at the base of the socket. Clean away any corrosion you may find on the tab as much as possible. With a small instrument, generally pry up on the metal tab to ensure that it will make solid contact with the light bulb.
  • Reinstall the bulb, plug the opener back in, and the bulb should illuminate.

I have to be very close to the garage door, or even within a few inches of the opener for my remote controls to work.Limited range of your remote controls could be related to radio frequency interference that comes from something in your home or in the surrounding environment. Certain electrical devices can radiate interference; this could be almost anything that is plugged into an electrical outlet.

Please keep in mind that the device can be brand new, or can be an item that has been in use for quite a while. Also, the item may continue to function properly as far as you are able to tell. The only problem with the item may be that it has started to broadcast the interference, with no other symptoms noted.

Some devices are more likely to generate interference than others. This includes TV cable, cable amplifiers, surge protectors, fluorescent lights, battery charging devices (power tools, golf carts, etc.), anything that utilizes a timer (sprinkler systems, lights, alarm systems, etc.), and a myriad of others. If the problem seems sporadic, we can safely assume that the device responsible for the interference is only being operated during those times. Again, please keep in mind that the age of the device does not determine if it is capable of broadcasting unwanted interference. Any electrical device can be the source of the problem.

The first step is replacing the battery in your remote. If the range on your remote does not improve, remove the wall control wires from the overhead unit. If the range does not improve you will likely need to replace the remote control. After replacing the remote, or if you have other remotes programmed in to the opener, and the range problem still exists, please proceed to the Power Down test.

Multiple garage doors:
If you have two garage door units and one is working just fine, you will need to start by unplugging the good unit. This will help determine if the unit with no range starts to function properly. If the range comes back to the bad unit then you will need to replace the logic board on the unit that was unplugged as it is emitting an RF signal that is over powering the other garage door opener. If the range does not improve after the “good” unit has been unplugged, replace the batteries and try programming some additional remotes to determine if the existing remotes are the issue. If the extra remotes do not have any range then you would need to replace the receiver logic board in the “bad” unit.

Power Down test:
To isolate potential sources of interference, turn the circuit breaker off to the garage and plug the garage door opener into an extension cord from another room. If the range improves, then the interference is coming from a device in the garage. If no improvement is seen follow the same procedure, this time turning off the circuit breakers to your home, with the exception of the garage, and test the remote controls. If improvement is noted, turn the circuit breakers back on, one by one, until the range problem resurfaces. This will allow you to narrow down what room the problem device is in. You will have to go from there to isolate it further, by unplugging and re-plugging the items in that room.

If you are unable to determine any source of interference, then the receiver logic board in the overhead unit will need to be replaced.

My garage door is opening and closing on its own. What can I do?

There are a few different things that can cause this type of problem.

  • Look at the LED light next to the SMART/LEARN button on the motor unit. If you are facing the garage door, the SMART/LEARN button is located on the rear end or right hand side panel of the motor unit. You may need to remove a light lens cover in order to see it. This button is either purple, red/orange, green, yellow, grey, or white in color. If the light is flashing rapidly this means you have a stuck button on one of your remote controls. Take the batteries out of each remote control. When you remove the batteries from the bad remote, the light will stop flashing. This remote needs to be replaced.
  • If one of your neighbor’s remote controls is inadvertently programmed into your receiver, your door will open when their remote is activated. If this happens you will need to clear out your receiver and reprogram your remote controls:
  • Press and hold the LEARN button for six seconds, or until you see the small LED light near the button turn itself off.
  • If the above steps have been followed and the symptoms continue, there may be an electronic short in either the wall control button or the receiver logic board. In this case, remove the wall control wires from terminals one and two (or red and white) on the motor unit. Should the symptoms persist after the wires are removed, replace the receiver logic board. If the symptoms stop with the wall control wires removed from the motor unit, replace the wall control button, and the wires leading to the wall control button.


ADJUSTMENTS

My door does not open or close far enough. What should I do?What are the limit/travel adjustments?How do I control my limit/travel adjustments?

The travel adjustments control the distance that the garage door opener moves the door. Separate adjustments can be made to both the opening travel distance and the closing travel distance. You will likely need to adjust your travel settings when encountering one of the following conditions:

  • The door does note open or close far enough, but does not reverse.
  • The door travels all the way to the floor, but reverses after coming in contact with the floor.
  • The opener fails the safety reversal test (see above)

There are two types of limit adjustment systems. Most openers will have a pair of limit adjustment screws on the side panel of the overhead opener. You may need to remove a light bulb cover in order access these adjustment screws. Refer to your owner’s manual for the exact location on your specific model. Your opener may have a label similar in appearance to the illustration. When the screw for the appropriate adjustment is turned in the direction of the arrow, the distance that the door moves in that direction is increased. Of course, turning the screw against the direction of the arrow will decrease that distance.

For example, turning the “down travel” screw counter-clockwise will cause the door to travel farther towards the floor. The second type of limit adjustment system is an automatic, electronic based system. Models that use this type of system include (but are not limited to) 2500B, 3500, 3850, and 3800. Please refer to your owner’s manual, “Adjustment Step 1 – Program Travel Limits” section for instructions concerning this type of system.

**Always test the safety reverse system after adjusting the opener.

What are force adjustments? My door reverses when closing, but the overhead lights do not flash. My opener stops when opening the door after less than 5 feet.

The force adjustments control the power used to open and close the door. A new garage door opener is factory preset to the lowest possible force adjustment. If you have a properly balanced door, the forces required to open and close the door should be minimal. The greater the force setting, the harder the opener will push or pull on the door before deciding that the door has encountered an obstruction. Never use a high force adjustment to compensate for a garage door that is unbalanced, binding, or sticking. To test your garage door for these conditions, please follow these steps:

  • Lift the garage door about half-way open as shown. Release the door. If properly balanced, the door should remain in place, supported entirely by its springs.
  • Raise and lower the door to see if there is any binding or sticking. The door should move freely and easily, without dragging or becoming difficult to move.

An easy rule of thumb is that a 10-year-old child should be able to lift and lower the garage door with little or no effort. If the door is hard to lift, the door must be serviced and adjusted by a professional authorized dealer.

Please remember that the easier it is for you to operate your garage door manually, the easier it will be for the new garage door opener to open the door, resulting in a longer lifespan for the new system.The force adjustments are usually located on the rear or right-side panel of the overhead garage door opener. You may need to remove a light bulb cover to access the adjustment screws. The force adjustments are labeled with an arrow indicating open or close and numbered 1 to 9, with one being the lowest force and nine the highest. The force adjustments can only turn 260 degrees, or ¾ of a complete turn. Changes to the forces should be done in 10-degree increments. Never force the adjustment screw if it becomes difficult to turn. Please remember that too much force will interfere with the proper operation of the safety reversal system. Do not increase the force beyond the minimum amount required to close the door.


PROGRAMMING REMOTE CONTROLS

My remote control has switches inside. How do I program it?

You are looking for a model we no longer support, as it was manufactured prior to 1993. Newer units have enhanced safety and security features — including photo-eyes as a secondary safety feature — that comply with new UL safety regulations. Because your current unit does not have these features, we strongly recommend that you upgrade your unit to a newer LiftMaster model.

How do I program my remote control?

Since 1993, Chamberlain’s remote controls have used an electronic security code as part of its remote control signal. This has made the remote control system more secure, and has made the remote controls themselves easier to program:

  • Locate the LEARN button on the overhead garage door opener. This button may be green, red, orange, purple, or blue, and will have an LED indicator light near the button. You can find the LEARN button on the rear or right side of the overhead opener. You may need to remove a light bulb cover or control cover to access the button.
  • Press and release the LEARN button. A small indicator light will glow steadily.
  • Within 30 seconds, press and hold the button you wish to use on your remote control. When programming is successful, the main light bulb(s) in the overhead opener will flash, and two “”clicks”” will be heard.
  • Release the button on the remote control, and press it again to test. The opener will operate.


Programming Wireless Keyless Entry Systems

How do I program my Wireless Keyless Entry System?

  • Locate the LEARN button on the back or side panel of the motor unit. You may need to remove a light cover or control center cover to gain access. This button may be yellow, white, gray, green, red or purple in color and will have an LED next to it.
  • Press and release the LEARN button. This turns the receiver on for thirty seconds.
  • Within this 30 second period, you must enter your new four-digit PIN into the keypad and hold the ENTER button for five seconds.
  • When the light on the keypad stops flashing, test your new code by entering the four-digit PIN and ENTER.

With the Model 976LM, 376LM, and 377LM (Or 940CB/940D/940D-01) Wireless Keyless Entry systems, you can program the accessory without climbing a ladder, right from your Multi-Function Control Panel:

  • Simply enter your pre-selected code and press and hold the ENTER button on your Keyless Entry.
  • Then press and hold the LIGHT button and the push button on your Multi-Function Control Panel.
  • Press and hold the main push bar on the wall control. The garage door opener lights will flash to confirm that the Keyless Entry has been successfully programmed.


EverCharge® Standby Power System

How long is the life of the battery in the EverCharge® Standby Power System?

Battery life depends a great deal upon ambient temperature. Our batteries will have a life of roughly 2-5 years in application depending on normal operating temperatures. A unit installed in Arizona, for example, will likely not last as long as a unit installed in Minnesota.

How do I know my EverCharge® Standby Power System is running on battery power?

If AC power is lost to your home, the garage door opener will automatically revert to battery power. A yellow LED on the back of the unit indicates battery-operation mode. Also, when the door is activated under battery power, a small piezo buzzer will “beep,” indicating door movement.


LIGHT BULBS

Can Compact Fluorescent Lightbulbs (CFLs) be used in LiftMaster garage door openers?

CFL or Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs are becoming a common trend in home lighting. A reason to switch to CFL bulbs is the benefit of using approximately 75% less energy than its incandescent counterpart.

Due to the different shapes and sizes, not all CFL Light Bulbs will work in all of our LiftMaster garage door openers. When the light lens on the garage door opener is closed, the bulb itself must fit without touching the light lens, cover or end panel and should never exceed the recommended wattage indicated by the user’s manual.

LiftMaster units are designed and tested to use the standard A19 light bulbs. The A19 light bulb used in LiftMaster garage door openers should be no larger than 2.375″ in diameter and no longer than 4.43″.

Current LiftMaster garage door openers have a maximum light bulb rating of 75 watts or 100 watts per socket. Using the wrong sized bulbs which exceed the maximum rating can lead to melted end-panels, sockets or lenses.

What other types of bulbs can I use?

Chamberlain recommends that only standard sized type A19 incandescent bulbs be used in our openers. Specialty bulbs of differing shapes and sizes should not be used, and may cause significant damage to the opener that is not covered by the warranty. Always refer to the owner’s manual for your model to verify the maximum wattage that can be used.


SURGE PROTECTOR

How will I know that the Surge Protector isn’t working anymore – that it’s done its job and needs to be replaced?

There is a Protection Indicator Light on the Surge Protector (a green LED). That LED is lit when the Surge Protector is working. This light will go off and the garage door opener will not work if the Surge Protector is blown (AC power is no longer available to the garage door opener).

I have a Surge Protector and my garage door opener won’t work anymore – what is wrong?

Check the Protection Indicator light on the Surge Protector. If it is not lit up, the Surge Protector has taken a surge large enough to blow its circuit and will need to be replaced. Simply remove the AC power from the Surge Protector and plug it directly into the outlet. The low voltage wires can remain plugged into the Surge Protector. Replace the Surge Protector immediately. Run the garage door opener to make sure all safety systems are working properly.


Support for Pre-1993 Units

My garage door opener is several years old. Will you still support it?

We are committed to the highest standards of product safety. Over the years, our LiftMaster brand has led the industry in introducing innovative product safety features. As a company, we have manufactured garage door openers for 50 years with a safety record that ranks as one of the best in the industry.

In the early 1990s, the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) enacted into law new rules ensuring that all garage door openers manufactured after 1992 had external entrapment protection devices, such as infrared sensors or sensing edges, in addition to the internal contact reverse mechanism. Garage door openers made prior to 1993 are safe and reliable if installed, tested, and maintained properly. However, the vast majority of these older units are not equipped with infrared sensors or other external entrapment protection devices, and thus do not meet today’s standards for garage door opener safety.

To insure the highest degree of safety and customer satisfaction, we believe it is important that pre-1993 garage door openers are replaced, as opposed to being repaired.

In 2008, Chamberlain made the decision to stop supporting the repair of all pre-1993 LiftMaster garage door openers, this includes technical service support and the sale of replacement parts. We believe this decision will provide you with the latest in technology and more safety, security, and convenience features. Chamberlain will not be responsible for warranty or liabilities incurred as a result of someone repairing a pre-1993 (non-infrared or safety sensing) garage door opener. We believe this decision is in the best interest of our customers, as safety always comes first.